Preposition of Time

Prepositions of Time: at, in, on

We use:

  • at for a PRECISE TIME
  • in for MONTHS, YEARS, CENTURIES and LONG PERIODS
  • on for DAYS and DATES

cats-crop 2

Look at these examples:

  • I have a meeting at 9am.
  • The shop closes at midnight.
  • Jane went home at lunchtime.
  • In England, it often snows in December.
  • Do you think we will go to Jupiter in the future?
  • There should be a lot of progress in the next century.
  • Do you work on Mondays?
  • Her birthday is on 20 November.
  • Where will you be on New Year’s Day?

Notice the use of the preposition of time at in the following standard expressions:

cats-crop 1

 

Notice the use of the prepositions of time in and on in these common expressions:

 

cats-crop 3

 

When we say last, next, every, this we do not also use at, in, on.

  • I went to London last June. (not in last June)
  • He’s coming back next Tuesday. (not on next Tuesday)
  • I go home every Easter. (not at every Easter)
  • We’ll call you this evening. (not in this evening)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s